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Home arrow Mixed Artists arrow Visual Artists arrow Mequitta Ahuja
Mequitta Ahuja PDF Print E-mail
Mequitta received an MFA from UIC in 2003, mentored by Kerry James Marshall. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including solo exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Lawndale Art Center in Houston and BravinLee Programs in New York. She has participated in group exhibitions including Global Feminisms at the Brooklyn Museum, Houston Collects African American Art at the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, Poets and Painters at the Ulrich Museum in Wichita and “Undercover” at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art.   In addition to exhibition catalogues, Mequitta’s work has appeared in Modern Painters, March 2007 and Art News, February 2007.  In February, 2010, Mequitta was profiled as an “Artist to Watch” in ArtNews.  Holland Cotter, art critic of the New York Times, in his "last chance" article in the June 1, 2007 edition of the Times,sighting Mequitta’s NY debut exhibition at BravinLee, stated "Referring to the artist’s African-American and East Indian background, the pictures turn marginality into a regal condition."

Mequitta was an awardee of the 2008 Houston Artadia Prize as well as the 2008 inaugural recipient of the Meredith and Cornelia Long Prize and recipient of a 2009 Joan Mitchell Award. Mequitta’s works are in many notable collections. Public collections include the Ulrich Museum in Wichita KS, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, The Philadelphia Museum of Art, U.S. State Department’s Mumbai, India offices and The Cleveland Clinic.  In addition to her studio practice, Mequitta is singularly responsible for the philosophy, structure and design of Blue Sky Project, an artist-in-residence program in Dayton, Ohio.  Mequitta was a 2010 artist-in-residence at the Studio Museum in Harlem.  Mequitta is self-represented.  She currently resides in Harlem. 

http://www.automythography.com/

 
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